What is "customers.tigertech.net"?

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If you host example.com with us, you can (of course) access your website using either of these “hostnames”:

http://www.example.com/
http://example.com/

It’s also possible to access it as:

http://example.com.customers.tigertech.net/

That’s intentional. If you transfer your Web hosting service from another company to Tiger Technologies, you need a way to test your website on our servers before the whole world sees it.

On this page:

Is the special hostname like a temporary IP address?

Yes. Some Web hosting companies give you a temporary raw “IP address” to use when you first sign up. We give you the temporary “example.com.customers.tigertech.net” hostname.

There’s no real difference between an IP address and a special hostname, except that we make sure that “example.com.customers.tigertech.net” permanently points at the current IP address of your site, even if the IP address changes.

So if the “temporary” address somehow gets permanently stored (some software stores the hostname for future use when you set it up), it will work for as long as you have hosting service with our company. This is a better situation than what happens if your software stores an IP address that later changes, which might cause your site to stop working.

What if I want to stop people from using the temporary address?

After you’ve finished switching your website to our company and the change has fully “propagated” across the Internet, you might want to discourage people from using the temporary address for cosmetic reasons.

If you installed WordPress using our “one-click installer” and left our Tiger Technologies WordPress plugin active, your WordPress Dashboard will tell you when it’s safe to stop using customers.tigertech.net and will show you a link that does so.

If you didn’t use our installer, or if you’ve disabled the plugin, you can remove “.customers.tigertech.net” from the end of the “WordPress address (URL)” and “Site address (URL)” in the Dashboard. Click Settings, then General. There’s more information about completely eliminating temporary addresses from WordPress on our Removing ".customers.tigertech.net" from WordPress links page.

If you don’t use WordPress, or if you want to make sure that even non-WordPress references to the temporary hostname also get handled, you could add these lines to your .htaccess file:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST}  (.+).customers.tigertech.net$ [nocase]
RewriteRule (.*)          http://%1/$1 [last,redirect=301]

This will make sure that visitors to “example.com.customers.tigertech.net” are redirected to “example.com”, that visitors to “www.example.com.customers.tigertech.net” are redirected to “www.example.com”, and so on.

If you’d like us to do this for you, just contact us and we’ll be happy to do it at no charge.

Will the temporary address get indexed in search engines?

It shouldn’t be, because we send a special “X-Robots-Tag: noindex” header for all such pages.

(If you’re concerned in general about making sure that search engines only display one URL for your site, no matter what URL they originally use to index it, you may want to add a canonical page tag to your Web pages.)

Can I test my site without using “customers.tigertech.net”?

Some users may want to test their site using the real example.com hostname, rather than using any kind of temporary URL.

To do this, you’d need to make your computer and Web browser think that example.com is already on our servers, even though the rest of the world still sees it at the old company.

There is a way to make that happen by editing your computer’s hosts file, although it’s a little complicated and we recommend that only technically advanced users try this.

How can I test an SSL certificate?

Unfortunately, it’s not possible to test a custom SSL certificate on our servers using the temporary hostname (or an IP address, for that matter), because your browser checks whether the hostname you type in your address bar matches the hostname in the certificate. You’d have to edit your computer’s hosts file to fully test that (in most cases, it’s not worth the complexity).