How do I change an email address?

This page explains how to change an email address you've created in our control panel.

For example, if you get married and change your name, you might want to change an email address from “oldname@example.com” to “newname@example.com”.

On this page:

Changing a forwarding address

If you're changing a forwarding address, you can simply add the new address.

For example, if you previously had oldname@example.com forwarding to example@aol.com, just add a second forwarding address to deliver newname@example.com to example@aol.com.

You can then tell people to start using the new address, although both addresses will continue to work as long as you don't delete the old forwarding address in our control panel. That way, you don't need to worry about whether everyone has updated their address book.

Changing a POP mailbox address

Changing a POP mailbox address can be a little trickier, because you might have old mail stored on our servers that you want to keep. This is especially likely if you use Webmail.

(If you are unsure of whether you have any mail stored on our servers, just login to our Webmail system and see if there is any mail.)

If you don't have any mail stored on our servers, there's no problem: Simply delete the old mailbox and create the new one. If you want the old address to continue working, add the old one as a forwarding address that delivers mail to the new address.

However, if you you want to change a mailbox address and you also need to keep a copy of some old messages on our servers, you need to be more careful to make sure you don't delete the old messages. The next sections discuss two ways you can do it.

Changing only the display address for a POP mailbox

If you don't mind using the old address on the Webmail login page, or as the “username” in a mail program on your own computer, you can continue to use the existing mailbox and simply change the name and address other people see.

To make this work, you'd create a new forwarding address that forwards the new address to the existing, old mailbox. Then you'd go into the preferences of Webmail or your mail program and change the display email address and display name to match the new address, without changing the login address.

For example, if you're changing oldname@example.com to newname@example.com, and you already have an oldname@example.com POP mailbox, you'd first create a new forwarding address that delivers newname@example.com to the oldname@example.com mailbox.

Then, if you use Webmail, click Preferences > Personal Information on the Webmail screens and change the “E-mail Address” to newname@example.com. (You can change the “Full Name” if you wish, too.) You'd continue using “oldname@example.com” on the Webmail login screen, but everyone else would see newname@example.com.

If you use a mail program such as Outlook on your own computer, it will have a similar setting that allows you to change the name and email address other people see. Be careful that you don't change the username or login name, though — it should still be “oldname@example.com”.

Creating a new POP mailbox, then using IMAP to copy old mail

If it bothers you to have to use the old address when logging in, there is one other method you can use to create a “real” new mailbox, but save the old messages.

To do this, create the new newname@example.com mailbox before you delete the old oldname@example.com mailbox, then use an IMAP mail client such as Mozilla Thunderbird to connect to both accounts simultaneously and drag the mail from the old account folders to the new folders.

After you've copied all the mail, you can delete the old mailbox (or replace it with a forwarding address if you want the old address to continue working).

Changing a mailbox domain name, too

If you're changing the part after the “@” sign (for example, if you're changing oldname@example.com to newname@some-other-domain.com), use the second method above: create the new mailbox, then use an IMAP program to copy over the existing messages before you delete the old one.